Skip to main content

About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
FOXNEWS 42
CNN 40
MSNBC 28
CSPAN 24
CSPAN2 9
WHUT (Howard University Television) 8
KQED (PBS) 6
WETA 5
KRCB (PBS) 3
WBAL (NBC) 3
WMPT (PBS) 3
WRC (NBC) 3
KGO (ABC) 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 182
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 182 (some duplicates have been removed)
command will likely look like when the u.s. transitions to what will be essentially a nato, plus arab countries. h isep model used in afghanistan as it's described to me. we understand the u.s. and france have come to a late agree in the the last few hours there is now no discrepancy between what france wants and what the u.s. wants. the president we understand is culting short his visit to latin america. he plans to transition. i'm told we can expect a transition of command by this time next week. the headquarters likely to be at a nato headquarters in naples, italy. the f-15 fighter jet went down at 11:33 monday evening local time according to u.s. marine officials. the two airmen ejected safely after an apparent malfunction of the jet. other pilots in the air at the time say they did not see enemy fire. seven u.s. military aircraft were launched from their bases in the mediterranean to take part in the recovery. two u.s. carrier jets flew cover for the mission and defense officials confirmed dropped two bomb to separate the pilot from suspected enemy approach. the downed pilot was
in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
has stressed that the role of the u.s. military would be limited in time and scope. our mission has been to use america's unique capabilities to create the conditions for the no-fly zone and to assist in meeting urgent humanitarian needs. as expected, we're already seeing a significant reduction in the number of u.s. planes involved in our operations as the number planes from other countries increase in numbers. today we are taking the next step. we have agreed, along with our nato allies, to transition command and control for the no-fly zone over libya to nato. all 28 allies have also now authorized military authorities to develop an operations plan for nato to take on the broader civilian protection mission under resolution 1973. nato is well-suited to coordinate this international effort and ensuring that all participating nations are working effectively together toward our shared goals. this coalition includes countries beyond nato including arab partners, and we expect all of them to be providing important political guidance going forward. we have always said that arab leer lea
to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
at the wreckage of a u.s. f-15 that crashed today in rebel-held eastern libya, for reasons the u.s. military says were mechanical, not hostile. i will say that again for you. the u.s. says the plane had equipment problems and was not shot down. the two-man crew jekted and the pilot was recovered quickly. the weapons officer was found by rebels and americans reached him. neither badly hurt. >>> back in tripoli, reporters saw the results of a missile landing on a port. >>> we also have remarkable pictures from misrata, a city down the coast that gadhafi forces have bombarded for days. this is amateur video uploaded to youtube yesterday. now, we can't confirm when or where it was shot, but we do know misrata's main hospital reports 77 deaths since sunday. the u.n.-approved campaign to protect libyan civilians began saturday and it's still not clear who will actually end up in charge. arab states don't want to work for nato and u.s. has other campaigns to worry about. nato says it will enforce a libyan arms embarge go the in meantime. let's bring in diana magnay, she's on the "uss keer sauj." nic rep
's talk about that also with retired u.s. army general george jalwan, the nato allied supreme commander. if in fact this is true that the president in recent days, maybe the past week or two, signed a covert action order, a finding, as they call it, to secretly assist the rebels who are fighting gadhafi's forces, what does that say to you? >> first of all, i have no knowledge of whether he signed a finding or not. it may be one of two things, may be an actual sort of action or it could be keep pressure on gadhafi to really feel the heat that he's feeling now with the resignation of his foreign minister and also with what i think is what is happening in london where the international community is very much united in what needs to be done. >> for all practical purposes the coalition, now nato control, they -- they have taken aside in this civil war, they want to help the rebels and see gadhafi go, even though the u.n. security council resolution didn't go that far as we all know. here's the question. if in fact the president signed a secret finding that goes way beyond what the coalition
, be careful over there. we'll stay in close touch. thank you. >>> u.s. officials say the defection shun of libya's foreign minister shows pressure is having an effect. moussa koussa led to london yesterday. hes the highest ranks official to break with the regime. he once serve as the intelligence chief, and has secrets to tell. the british prime minister says there's no deal of any kind to give moussa koussa immunity. joining us from tripoli, nic robertson. nic, you're getting some reaction from the libyan government on the defection shun of the foreign minister moussa koussa. >> reporter: we haven't had a reaction from the top, gu the government is saying they allowed him to deeffect, because of health reasons. they said he had a heart condition, but it's very clear from the fact that it took them limb 24 hours to respond to the defection that they didn't know it was coming. the government's trying to put the best face on it that they can, but it rings hollow. moussa koussa tricked this government, tricked the leadership and has left the country and left them hanging, wolf. >> how sign
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
>>> this sunday, the allied strike against libya stretches into its second week as the u.s. seeks to limit its role. >> responsibility for this operation is being transferred from the united states to our nato allies and partners. >> but as criticism from congress mounts, many questions remain. what happens if gadhafi clings to power? what are the limits of the u.s.'s role if a civil war gets worse? and how does a military campaign relate to our overall strategy in the mideast? this morning, a special joint interview, with us, the secretary of state hillary clinton and secretary of defense robert gates. >>> then -- the president faces critics from both sides of the aisle. did he overstep his constitutional authority by using force without consulting congress. my interview this morning with republican from indiana senator richard lugar. >>> finally, analysis of the administration's handling of the crisis in libya is our fragile economic recovery continues and our military is stretched thin by two other wars, did the president make the case to the american people that libya is worth
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
by the president where u.s. military participation here would end. >>> plus, a troubling turn in japan. workers are pulled from the crippled reactor complex after smoke is seen rising from two of the reactors overnight. how big a setback is this? >>> it's monday, march 21st, 2011. i'm willie geist. chuck and savannah are traveling with the president in south america. we will hear from them later this hour. >>> let's get right to the run down, we begin with operation odyssey dawn in libya. punishing air strikes drove pro-gadhafi forces further from home base last night though it is unclear where gadhafi is at this hour. rebels celebrated after u.s., british and french planes demolished libyan tanks and took out air defenses. overnight the opposition said it had regained almost 40 miles of territory. colonel gadhafi appears to have escaped harm in the attack on his administration building. he has though warned of a long war and said he'd open up the government's arsenal to arm his supporters. >>> on sunday defense secretary robert gates reiterated that the u.s. has no plans to send in ground forc
. >> thank you, jim, for that. >>> president obama says it's not always up to the u.s. to step in when there's turmoil overseas. but in a preview to his national address on monday, the president says the current crisis in libya demands america's attention. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there's a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized, when someone like gadhafi threatens a bloodbath that could destabilize a national region, then it's in our national interest to act. >> nbc's mike viqueira is our national correspondent on alex. >> what prompted the president to speak out on monday? >> after criticism from the left and the right, democrats and republicans here in washington. the president is suffering from two perceptions here, alex. first, this came very suddenly. usually when americans start to see tomahawks flying off or airplanes in flight drops dropping smart bombs, it comes after weeks if not months of debate. there was no such -- there was no such action. secretary of state hillary clinton was i
clear that no u.s. boots will be on the ground in libya but how long air strikes by u.s. pilots will continue is on everyone's mind right now. those strikes, which include six more tomahawk missile strike have led to a rapid sweep of forces east to west. in the past 49 hours, rebels from taken key towns and striking at sirte, as we speak, the hometown of moammar gadhafi. nbc's chuck todd live at white house here. some of the president's critic says he should have given the speech that we're expecting tonight before the strikes began. >> reporter: well, look, there was even some debate among some supporters of the president on that very notion. but that's -- that's not going to happen. you can't turn back the clock. so the decision was made. they would wait until there was -- they were done with the u.s. portion of this. and so, it's not a mere coincidence that when the handover to nato to run this no-fly zone is taking place, that the president is going to use the occasion to both make the case for why he made this decision, number one, and number two, it's going to be valedicto
that it will be brief. he will be speaking from the u.s. army right here in the nation's cap tell and speaking to a country that has mixed feelings about the third military intervention in the past decade and not to convince that this mission has a clear goal or exit strategy. the commander in chief will be speaking about how long and decision to intervening here and the united states and violence against demonstrators in bahrain, syria, another hot spot in the middle east. wolf blitzer will rejoin us before and after the president's big address, including anderson cooper as well as reports from inside experience team and great experience team of analysts. let's begin on the ground in libya. we'll check out the map. one clear result if you take a close look at the air strikes and remove here, i want to go back to march 18th. the day before the strikes began, the day before, you can see right here in red, these were towns just before, just before the strikes began. controlled red meaning controlled by the regime. look where we are today. controlled green. that is controlled by the opposition. t
shattered by a new round of gunfire that follows a weekend of u.s. led air strikes. president obama answering questions this afternoon for the first time since sending our fighter jets into action. >> the core principle that has to be upheld here is that when the entire international community, almost unanimously, says that there is a potential humanitarian crisis about to take place that a leader who has lost his legitimacy decides to turn his military on his own people, that we can't simply stand by with empty words. >> one of this weekend's bombings badly damaged president gadhafi's compound. pro-gadhafi forces opened fire on a crowd of rebels in mizratah today killing nine of them gaining control of that area seen as critical for gadhafi on a strategic level. what is happening in libya? the latest headline from the uprisingings throughout the middle east look like this away from libya. yemen also in crisis right now. the president is losing his grip on power. he dissolved his cabinet over the weekend but for the growing groups of protesters that's not enough. some of the members
the american people tonight to explain the u.s. mission in libya. the reasoning behind it. the u.s. military's role, and are we go from here. all this comes on the heels of a significant, rather, a dramatic victory for the administration with nato agreeing yesterday to take command of the mission including the ground attack. that as international airstrikes continue for the 9th night over the nation. libya state tv broadcast these images from a southern city of sabha claiming the attacks were against civilians. top nato commander today hitting back against suggestions that nato forces are essentially providing air cover for the rebels. >> our goal, our goal, it is to help protect civilians and population centers from attack or that are the threat of an attack. >>shepard: the in six not to take sides but we have. the opposition is benefiting, before the no-fly zone they were in trouble but this has weakened the military. and now the two sides are fighting on equal terms because of us and they are closing in on muammar qaddafi's hometown, a key government stronghold on the road to tripoli. and
safe for infants, i'm wolf blitzer, you're in the "situation room." in a span of 24 hours, the u.s. military said the coalition launched more than 50 strikes in the mission to protect libyan civilians. but no indication the battle is being over. just a short while ago the secretary of state warned gadhafi the quickest way to end it is for him to leave.<[kyk: . we2íor certainly encouraged the would make a right decision. not only institute a real co comprehensive cease-fire but withdraw from the cities and military abs and prepare for a transition that does not incl e include. >> there are serious reports of major clashes under way. what do we know about the fighting at this moment. >> you just heard secretary of state hillary clinton encouraging momammar gadhafi bu he's not backing down. a couple of major developments that shows that this conflict is far from over. anded stage is set from what could be a lengthy and complicated conflict. let's start with a strategically strategic city. then gadhafi forces took it over. when the momentum shifted back to the opposition forces and t
week." u.s. and allied bombs and missiles hammer libyan targets. the rebels gain ground. and the president prepares to make his pitch to the american people. >> it's u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> what if gadhafi stays? just back from the middle east, robert gates and hillary clinton come to "this week" for their first interviews since the attacks began to make the president's case. what does victory look like? kit be achieved? at what cost? >>> then -- >> i don't have any regrets at all. >> what would donald rumsfeld do in a third war. and he'll respond to critics who say he's been rewriting history. >>> and george will and the "roundtable" will talk to us. why is one hopeful having a tough time agreeing with himself. >> announcer: live from the newseum. >>> some major developments in libya. rebel forces have scored a key victory taking back the oil town of brega in theest. they continue the push west. abc's alex marquardt is in benghazi. what is the mood there? >> reporter: a lot of gun fire and horn honking. a quick advance toward the west was expected follo
patrolling off libya's coast, this as the u.s. gets ready to hand over control of the no fly zone to the alliance. whatever that alliance is. we don't know at this time. in the meantime pro car davi forces ratchet up attacks in an eastern city of that country, stopping rebel groups there, but the international air strikes continue and now we have reports that those attacks forced pro qaddafi forces to withdraw tanks from another rebel-held city in the west. a whole lot goes on there today, jon. jon: the libyan leader remains as defiant as ever, appearing from his compound in tripoli and vowing to win the historic battle. now there's word, though, that mommar qaddafi may be planning his exit strategy. secretary of state hillary clinton, weighing in on that on abc's "world news with diane sawyer". >> this is what we hear from so many sources, diane, it is a constanto. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it, i'll be very, you know -- it's my personal opinion -- some of it is theater. a lot of it is just the way he bee haves. it's somewhat unpredictable. but some of
. scuba diving. bill: not new jersey. martha: they are getting out of the u.s., not new jersey. we'll be right back tomorrow, same time same place, see you then. jon: right now breaking developments and brand-new stories this hour. the attack on libya. a ferocious era salt to enforce the no-fly zone and qaddafi's compound among the targets. smoke rises from two damaged reactors. radiation detected in the count three's food and water supply. the 9/11 trials at guantanamo bay, what the lawyers that are set to try the cases are selling faction. how they believe the obama administration may be working to keep these cases out of gitmo. all new, all live "happening now." and good morning to you i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we're so glad you are with us. we are here in the fox newsroom. happening right now we have a fox news alert out of libya. the u.s. navy releasing grand new video of the punishing nighttime assaults on qaddafi forces. they are using b.-2 stealth bombers, jet fighters and tom hawk missiles. jon: qaddhafi's forces come under fire across the count three. the secur
the u.s. mission there in libya about cost, about an exit strategy. the president and other senior administration officials have talked about this and narrowly defined in their row focus of this mission. and that the u.s., which has been taking a supporting -- a leading role rather would move in the second phase to a supporting role. what would that look like? well, jay carney, white house spokesman today said that u.s. jets would not be used in enforcing any kind of no-fly zone but it would be more of an assist role perhaps providing jamming technology, even intelligence. so that is how the white house sees this next phase of the mission in live xwrap but again, no official reaction yet to this agreement. one other point i should make is that you know, we're waiting to find out if perhaps the president will make any public comments about this to the american people. there have been a lot of questions about the president perhaps not fully explaining all of the ins and outs of this mission to the american people. the white house has pushed back on that saying from the beginning whet
about this? "jihadis that fought us the u.s. in iraq and afghanistan now enjoy american support in libya." excuse me? that means the people who we were actually shooting at on the battlefield, we now giving arms to in libya. this libya rebel commander says his fighters have al-qaeda links. we'll have more on the story at the bottom of the hour. let's see if we have this right. we have a nobel peace prize winning president, encouraging unrest in the mast. saying rise up, isn't this great? look, now people are rising up. people are getting killed everywhere. then he gave the commander to launch america's third military conflict with a muslim nation that poses no immediate threat. never made the case to the american people. and no exit strategy. no one is even asking or answering the question what does victory look like? chaos. the "new york times" is reporting now that the muslim brotherhood has now formed a tactic partnership with the egyptian military. oh, that seems great. and they're poised to grab control. what do you say? shirria law? no -- shiria law? no. in libya, guess who is lini
, briefing them to a conference call about the u.s. nato's agreement to take charge of the no-fly zone. over at the pentagon, a top adral haa story that may indicate colonel gadhafi is getting desperate. >> we received reports today that he has taken to armying what he calls volunteers to fight opposition. i'm not sure whether they truly are volunteers or not and i of these ow many recruits he's going to get but i find it interesting that he may now feel it necessary to seek civilian reinforcements. >> reporter: turning nowo the libyan capital, we're joined by cnn senior correspondent nick robertn who is in tripoli. hi, nick. libyan officials, we understand, took you to eastern tripoli today and showed you theon effes of the coalition bombing campaign. what did you see when you were on the outskirts of the city? >> reporter: well, they wanted to show us civilian casualties which they weren't able to. sho us. they took to us a farm that appeared, part of the farmland area had been struck by a missile. we couldn't tell where the missile had come from or even who had fired it. what we saw when
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
libya's air defenses. the u.s. and british military fired a total of 124 tomahawk cruise missiles. u.s. officials say they are getting ready to hand over operational control of the military mission. >> we expect in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we'll be a member of the coalition. we'll have a military role in the coalition. we will not have the pre-eminent role. >> let's get the military perspective on this from cnn's pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. let's start with secretary gates pledge to hand over control in just a couple days. first, what exactly does that mean and is it realistic? >> what it means is they are looking now to set up some sort of structure by which another entity could take control that could be nato although i've been told by a source that there is some reluctance to fly under a nato flag and another thing is so up a separate command and control structure. in one key area u.s. participation may have already peaked this morning. i was told just this morning by an offi
in jerusalem killed one person and wounded more than 50. israel's ambassador to the u.s. says that the bombing does not appear related to militants' recent rocket attacks on southern israel. >>> defense secretary robert gates met with his israeli counterpart in tel aviv today. and he is urging the israelis to restart peace negotiations with the palestinians. defense officials say that gates believes israel can get ahead of the pop ulous wave across the middle east by pressing a peace deal. >>> and hundreds of potential jurors are at the los angeles county courthouse today. 12 will be chosen to decide whether michael jackson's doctor goes to prison. dr. conrad murray is charged with giving jackson an overdose of an anesthetic. opening statements in the trial are set for may. >>> now more for our top story. there are safety concerns at reagan national airport. after two pilots were unable to reach the control tower before landing. our sandra endo is in washington with details. first of all, sandra, the flight landed safely, but there's still so many questions here. the real issue, why the contro
united does admit that united will be shrinking it's domestic u.s. network because, he says, the focus in the future is going to be on international coverage. >> the domestic u.s. is a very difficult place to make money. brutal regulation and overtaxation, so it's very hard to make money domestically and that's why our growth has been international. even this year as we were originally going to grow between 1% and 2% this year and because of high fuel prices, we have brought that back to flat. but even there, that flat is comprised of shrink the domestic systems and growing the international systems. >> this is fascinating because this tells us that the united-continental merger says that airlines in the united states is going to start to look very different. it's got these massive hubs, chicago, washington, houston, newark, los angeles, san francisco, denver. but they're going to be geared to funneling out to the rest of the world. >> so did he say anything about the frequent flyer miles? that's what i want to know. >> tell me about it. he did admit that between them, united and conti
a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according to u.s. officials, coalition strikes have successfully crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no-fly zone is effectively in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's tripoli compound last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown. he has vowed to fight a long, drawn out war with western forces. making the rounds on the sunday talk shows, admiral mike mullen stressed that the u.s. role in libya would be limited but he did not give an exact date of how long the u.s. would remain involved. >> there's no one that understands better than i that the stress and the strain that we've been under for a long time in our tenth year of war, both in iraq and in afghanistan. that said, we are within our capability and capacity to be able to execute this mission. the directions have been given to me, it is limited. it is very focused and in that regard, we're more than able, as has been shown
in libya, what's the end game, how do we get out? the role the u.s. will play from here on out and how important is it that gadhafi goes. and how did we wind up fighting in a country that even the country's own defense secretary on sunday said is not a vital u.s. interest. tonight, we'll look at what the president needs to say and the big stakes for him politically in lya if the effort for him goes bad. then we'll bring the president's speech live from the national war college here inform washington, d.c. let's begin with andrea mitch l mitchell. and of course, the huffington post's howard fineman who is an msnbc political analyst. what must the president say? here's a couple of clips. >> when someone like gadhafi threatens a bloodbath that could destabilize an entire region and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> that was the radio address on saturday. here's what he said in south america last week about why we're there. >> our military action is in support of an international man
the u.s. toll the military personnel in japan to keep around the plant. so, we believe the evacuation zone now is voluntary evacuation but that is causing a problem for those who want to get appear because a number of people who is left but there is no gas so people have cars but have not gas for the cars. so they cannot get away from the radiation at the fukushima plants and the highly radioactive water is leaking from four of the troubled nuclear reactors and they think it is seeping out from reactor number three the troublesome of the lot of them, and where we saw the workers trying to tackle the situation, and they received radioactive burns on their legs and feet because they were in a pool of radioactive water that seeped into the boots and were not protected enough for them they have actually absorbed radiation into their bodies, two of the workers have, and the doctors say the prognosis is not looking good. a bit of good news, finally, from japan, and that is tokyo's tap water and the radioactive isotopes they found on when is back in safe levels and has not stopped people fro
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
on u.s. actions in libya. that speech is scheduled for monday, 7:30 p.m. eastern time. watch it live right here on the fox news channel. >> heather: as we reported at the top of the show we do have new reaction coming to the death of an american pioneer led the way for women and politics, broke that glass ceiling. >> gregg: joining us -- do we have -- apparently we don't. july july with the latest. >> julie: after suffering complications of blood cancer she had battled for 12 years, geraldine ferraro was surrounded by her family when she passed away this morning at massachusetts general hospital. and president obama just moments ago, he says he will forever be remembered as a trail blazer that broke down barriers for women. whether it was at a public school, a teacher, an assistant district attorney, member of congress or candidate for vice president. she fought to uphold the founding ideals of quality and justice and opportunity for all. she leaves behind her husband, three children and eight grandchildren. in a statement her family says geraldine ferraro was widely known as a leade
, and what u.s., nato and allied roles will be, we talked to senators john mccain and jack reed. >> there are times where the greatest nation in the world and the strong eh nation in the world has to act alone, that is not the preference, and the preference is to build coalitions as we have most of the times in the past. i think that president obama may be unintentionally or intentionally conveying the impression that we can never act alone. i don't think that is appropriate, given possible scenarios. >> as we have seen, this trance formative effect in egypt and tunisia, i can't we want to encourage that but we want to recognize it is best done through a coalition, it is best done by using the particularly unique capabilities of the united states, but not committing our forces to long-term engagements. >> and david ignatius of the washington post, david ignatius, doyle mcmanus and julianna goldman. >> it is exhilarating seeing for people calling for change and sweeping away governments and yet where it is going, what the risks are for the united states, nobody knows, and i think
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 182 (some duplicates have been removed)